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LG UltraWide 35WN75C – 10 things you need to know

lg-ultrawide-35WN75C

Are you thinking of buying the LG UltraWide 35WN75C curved monitor? Then you must first know the model’s strengths and weaknesses. Here we have gathered the most important things you need to know before making a purchase.

  • Excellent office screen at a reasonable price
  • Should be used with a more stable screen stand
  • Works for some games – serious gamers should look further

Positively

  • Affordable screen if you find it around SEK 5,000
  • 35 inches and 3,440 x 1440 pixels
  • USB-C with 94 watt power supply for laptop
  • USB hub with 2x USB-A
  • Good sharpness for text and minimal lag

Negative

  • Unstable screen base and cheap screw that holds the stand together
  • Back bleed on the VA panel provides uneven lighting
  • Limited support for FreeSync and G-Sync
  • The colors are faded on the edges (usually with VA panels)

The display stand is unstable

If you are going to use the UltraWide 35WN75C with the original stand, you can expect it to wobble a bit. At least if you have a smaller, unstable desk. The slightest movement in the desktop causes the display stand to wobble.

With that said, we see no indication that the screen itself would sit badly on the stand. We are not afraid that the screen itself will fall off or that it will be loose. Only the stand is cheap and plastic.

2. The screw for the stand is of poor quality

When you attach the stand to the screen, it is done in three steps. The foot is first attached to the raised and lowered arm. Then the screen in the screen stand with four screws.

The screw that holds the foot and arm together is of poor quality. At least the part you are holding to pull around the screw. It has a super-thin metal part that bends to the pressure when you pull around the screw, so do it very carefully.

Slight curvature on the screen gives poor colors at the edges

This is not a disadvantage or advantage in itself, but an observation. The screen uses a VA panel with only a slight curvature. This means that the edges get dull and faded colors

Since it is a VA panel, it is expected on this screen and it is not quite as disturbing as it sounds. But if you have, for example, a really dark field in the left or right edge, it will be greyish.

The same applies to the lighting. You get even and nice lighting straight from the front, but when you look to the sides, the brightness of the screen decreases significantly. The difference is very clear, but it does not negatively affect everyone’s experience.

4. UltraWide 35WN75C has major problems with USB-C

Many users report problems with the USB-C connector. In some cases, the connector has not only broken once, but several times so that the screen has had to be serviced repeatedly.

It is not a problem if you only intend to use the ports for USB-A, HDMI and Displayport.

However, if you want to use a Mac, USB-C is almost a must, and then it is important that the port works. If you want a reliable and stable port for USB-C, you should look for another monitor.

5. Back bleed is common on this screen type

Expect the backlight in your new VA screen to have so-called “back bleed”. This is a problem where the lighting shines through at the edges and creates bright areas that are visible when the screen is dark.

This is more the rule than the exception on VA-based monitors like the UltraWide 35WN75C and is not something that only affects LG models.

The problem is most visible when you have completely black areas around the edges of the screen, for example if you are watching a movie with so-called grief edges. It is also most visible with high brightness on the screen and when it is dark in the room.

On our screen we have two bright zones on the left and right on the upper edge of the screen. It can be seen from the sides but hardly anything at all from the front. It is only clear to us in light parts, but not dark., So it is not a problem for example if we watch movies. However, in games, it is clear when everything at the top edge of the screen is brighter than just a few inches below.

6. 100Hz / 5ms GtG is good for offices – not gaming

The LG UltraWide 35WN75C is something of a hybrid screen that works really well for office work and decent for some gamers. We say some, because this is a slow screen that does not work well for the fastest FPS titles like Overwatch or Counter-Strike.

With 100Hz, you get a soft and nice image when you work in regular office or school programs. Or just surfing the internet for that matter.

You can also play for example World of Warcraft or League of Legends without any problems. It works great with 100Hz and 5ms GtG that the screen can handle. However, you should not use UltraWide 35WN75C with really fast FPS titles and the like.

The screen simply does not stick and you risk lagging behind the graphics in dark areas. It is called “ghosting” and is a common problem on VA panels.

Our model has minimal ghosting, but the screen is nowhere near what a fast, gaming-oriented IPS screen can handle with 144+ Hz and 1ms GtG. Demanding gamers – choose another screen!

Limited support for AMD FreeSync and Nvidia G-Sync

The LG UltraWide 35WN75C supports AMD FreeSync and is at least on paper compatible with G-Sync.

However, our screen did not want to play nicely with our RTX 3080, which gave black screen flashes when the frame rate (Hz) went below 50-60 fps in games.

In addition, the screen is limited, as mentioned above, to 100Hz and 5ms GtG, so we would not use this screen as a gaming screen more than in exceptional cases (as in MOBA games and the like).

Our advice is that you choose a screen of 2,560 x 1,440 pixels with 144+ Hz and 1ms GtG as well as IPS panel for serious, daily gaming. Not a 3,440 x 1,440 pixels, 100 Hz and 5ms GtG with ghosting. Just a little tip.

8. LG OnScreen Control controls the screen in Windows 10 and macOS

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